American Justice In The 1800’s

Lynch mobs, posses, noon showdowns….clearly, laws have changed considerably over the last two centuries. In the 19th century as the American frontier was expanding, many times there were simply not enough lawmen to enforce the laws, or people decided to take matters into their own hands. At any rate, the justice system of the 1800s had some significant differences than the one of today, both formally and informally. Following are three examples of the different ways that justice was obtained, from civil means to downright barbaric acts, in the 19th century.

The lynching of Henry Smith – The lynch mobs of the 1800s provide one of the best examples chaotic and ruthless vigilante justice that has ever been shown. Barbaric by nature, these acts were often committed in the heat of the moment, when anger levels were high and the need for revenge was great. Sadly, many of the people executed were not even guilty of the offenses with which they had been charged, or their crimes were certainly not enough to warrant such a punishment. One of the most famous lynchings during this time period was that of Henry Smith in 1893. Smith was an ex-slave living in Texas when he was accused of the murder of a 3-year-old white girl, the daughter of a policeman. Though his role in the child’s murder was not certain, there would be no trial for Smith; once he was found, he would be forced to endure one of the most horrific acts of torture recorded in American history. Before of a crowd of 10,000 people eager to watch Smith suffer, he was tortured relentlessly before being burned alive. With his body lifeless on the ground, the crowd cheered their joy at justice having been served.

The work of Pinkerton detectives – The Pinkerton National Detective Agency provided another means to bring criminals to justice. Founded in 1850, the Pinkertons, as the detectives were known, managed to track hundreds of criminals to see justice served, including Jesse James, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and the Irish Molly Maguires. At one time the agency employed more agents than the U.S. Army had soldiers, and it had more mug shots than any other law enforcement agency in the country. Besides their fine detective skills, the Pinkertons were also well-known for their diligence in tracking and capturing known criminals, even following some across the several states. The detectives worked hard to see justice served, and it paid off. Though the agency no longer exists today as it did then, it is remembered as a successful law enforcement group that worked tirelessly to defend the rights and freedoms of law-abiding citizens and give criminals their due.

The murder trial of Octavius Barron – When Octavius Barron murdered William Lyman in 1837, he was granted a fair trial by the public in Rochester, New York. On the night of October 20, 18-year-old Barron pointed his pistol at the back of Lyman’s head and fired at point blank range. It didn’t take long for authorities to piece together what Barron had done; with his open bragging of the crime, his reputation as a less than respectable citizen, and even eye witness accounts, police officers were quick to find and arrest the young man. Charged with murder, Barron faced a trial that was scheduled to begin on May 28, 1838. Though it lasted only 10 days, the trial was a spectacle to behold for the citizens of Rochester, who packed the courthouse daily. Eager to hear all the details, jurors, attorneys, court employees, and the public listened intently to hours of argument from both the prosecution and the defense. All the while, Barron maintained his plea of not guilty. The jury spent only 15 minutes deciding the young man’s fate; he was guilty with a sentence to die. After his execution on July 25, 1838, the majority opinion was that justice had been served – a life for a life.

But the story of Octavius Barron and William Lyman doesn’t end there. You can learn more about the men, the murder, and the meaning of redemption with “Visions: True Stories of the Supernatural,” a documentary by Ad-Hoc Productions. Learn more about this fascinating tale at http://www.ad-hoc-productions.com/.

Law Schools Fighting For Human Rights

As human rights violations continue to occur around the globe, law schools are establishing human rights clinics to meet the ever increasing demand for human rights lawyers. These United States based institutions are not only working to strengthen their own communities, but also to train students and professors, organizations and professionals, who are working to strengthen these rights outside of the United States.

Even though the Universal Declaration of Human Rights forms the basis of International Human Rights Law, the Declaration itself is not legally binding. However, civil rights clinics are training lawyers to strengthen the enforcement of such rights and increase adherence to the agreements that several nation-states have signed.

While international law is a relatively young field, many distinguished law schools have created outstanding programs for aspiring civil rights lawyers and professors. At Columbia Law School’s Justice Clinic, students and professors focus on the cross cultural implications of international law, and encourage students to immerse themselves in today’s human and civil rights battles.

The clinic focuses on providing students with a number of different skills that are necessary in the field. For example, the clinic instructs students on how to conduct investigative research and interviews that are necessary for human rights cases. Unlike many other fields of law, these on the ground skills are necessary for learning how to identify human and civil rights abuses in a number of different settings and how to empower local organizations and lawyers to bring violators to trial.  

Similarly in Harvard Law School’s International Justice Clinic, students learn about these rights through current events. While the clinic is based in Cambridge, students regularly travel internationally to document human and civil rights abuses and promote respect for international law.

Harvard’s program also provides students with connections to dozens of organizations throughout the world that are seeking to bring human and civil rights cases to trial. The clinic provides funding for research during summer and winter breaks and free support to dozens of countries where human rights violations occur on a mass scale.

At Yale Law School, the Lowenstein Human Rights Project enables students to pursue human and civil rights on an extracurricular basis. In this clinic, small groups of students work together with public interest and human rights NGOs, conducting research, designing advocacy activities, and organizing events that bring further attention to human and civil rights violations in the United States and abroad.

Stanford Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic also works to integrate classroom learning with experience in the field. In recent years, Stanford has mandated that students’ first course is about the clash between International Human and Civil Rights Law and the United States actions in Guantanamo. This course is coupled with subsequent international travel where students help universities abroad establish human and civil rights clinics of their own. Last fall, Stanford’s Human and Civil Rights Clinic also started providing free coordination of international doctors and psychologists in order to train local medical professionals to deal with rights violations in their own countries.  

While several distinguished universities have established human and civil rights clinics, one of the most promising clinics was launched just last year, in August of 2008. The Sanela Diana Jenkins International Justice Clinic at UCLA is a unique interdisciplinary program that seeks to be focused and dynamic.

Established with a generous donation of $4 million from Diana Jenkins [http://www.dianajenkins.co.uk/], a refugee of the Bosnian war in Sarajevo, the clinic helps students and professors create and implement new advocacy strategies. By focusing on advocacy, the Jenkins International Justice Clinic hopes to teach lawyers how to draw national and international attention to human rights violations, creating the necessary pressure that inspires nation-states to enforce human and civil rights law.

In honor of Diana Jenkins and the schools commencement, students and faculty dedicated their first academic year to the war crimes committed in Bosnia and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

As these human rights clinics continue to grow, their efforts will surely be seen in the coming years. Already their work has deeply influenced individuals and organizations in the United States and abroad and strengthened the implementation of international law. In the fight against human rights violations, these clinics are necessary for training the future’s leaders and strengthening international law around the world.

The Future of Crime and Punishment

Gilbert and Sullivan said in their much loved opera Mikado well over a 100 years ago:

“My object all sublime

I shall achieve in time –

To let the punishment fit the crime-

The punishment fit the crime”.

Since then the criminal justice system has been quite predictable and clear. Once a person is found to be guilty of a crime, through the procedures set by policing, laws, courts and juries, they are subjected to fines, imprisonment lasting from a few days to life or even the death penalty (in countries that still have this.) Though one may not always agree with the specific punishment dished out in a particular case, the principles behind it are clear. But once the nature of crimes change, how will it affect our justice system? Will the nature of punishment be forced to change too?

The law enforcers and the justice system seem to be caught napping, always one step behind. Thus we see airport security beefed up after 9/11, hotel security instituted after attacks on hotels and malls being protected by close circuit cameras and X-ray machines after malls have been targeted.

New technologies have put new weapons in the hands of criminals, often to disastrous effect. Cyber crimes are already very much part of today’s world, but how far can the cyber criminals go? One of the biggest crimes so far has been that of a hacking attack that stole over 105 million records, and over a billion email addresses. These could lead the criminals to bank account details, health records and corporate networks, personal details that could be used for blackmail purposes, apart from a myriad of other uses.

Manipulation of close circuit cameras and X-ray machines at strategic location also gives access to people carrying unlawful weapons, bombs and other material. Are we about to witness a new epidemic of airplane hijacking, assassinations of leaders and takeover of strategic assets? If this sounds unrealistic and far-fetched, it makes sense to remember that in December 2009 insurgents in Iraq managed to hack into drones that were surveying the area and were able to watch the same images that US military were watching sitting in offices back home. This of course gave the insurgents a very good idea as to where to attack and when to lie low. The cost to the Iraqi insurgents was software available off the net for US$ 26. The cost to the US military for one Predator drone is $4-5 million. The cost per flight hour of Predator is around $2,500-3,500. Talk about asymmetry!

But going beyond the cyber attack, hackers could soon be manipulating genetic code as they do computer code. This leads to another level of crime altogether. Would a bio-hacker be able to manipulate the genome code to pass on viruses or malicious worms, much as are done via the internet today? Would they be able to fiddle remotely with bio-synthetic organs such as pace-makers and insulin pumps? Even today many of these can be adjusted remotely, with the huge benefit to patients of allowing more mobility and removing the need for repetitive surgery. However, if they can be manipulated by criminals, what would they be able to achieve? Would they be able to manipulate a persons mind, hormones and moods to turn them into criminals? Will future terrorist groups have a never-ending supply of manipulated people to be able to carry out acts of terror?

Its bonanza time for trans-national crime groups who can carry out crimes in distant parts of the world without any fear of being caught red-handed. As the criminals can transfer large funds of money and other resources across the world remotely, they can be sure of their own safety. Looking at the unbelievable damage that criminals could wreak upon the world using some of the new technologies, what kind of punishment would fit the crime? There is much discussion on neurological reconditioning of criminals, on transformation and on deterrence. In fact there is also the idea of punishing criminals for crime that would be committed in the future.

The most intriguing punishment that I came across has been recently revealed by Rebecca Roache who says that future biotechnology methods could be used to make a criminal serve 1000 years of jail in just 8 hours, by manipulating his mind to make the time pass more slowly. This would prevent the huge costs of looking after criminals in jails. It would be interesting to see what would be his reaction to the world around him once he was set free. Would he able to adjust to the world around him again, or live in a time warp, where he felt that he had been put into a time machine and sent back 1000 years, or would be just go back to the same old routines of the previous days and years?

“To let the punishment fit the crime” has never been an easy task. The nature of future crimes is only going to make it more difficult.

Staying Away From the US Department of Justice Virus

Department of Justice Virus is one of the latest threats from Ukash virus group that try to attack people living in the United States of America. This threat belongs to the category of ransomware, so it is designed to get inside the system secretly and then try to rip users off. Just like other related viruses such as the money pack virus – it creates lots of troubles for its victims by locking the system down. This results is complete system’s take over – user becomes incapable to get on the Internet, launch legitimate anti-malware programs or do other things on his PC. He only sees a forged Department of Justice Virus alert, which states that user is caught doing illegal activities on his computer. Before you fall for this alert, you must note that such organizations as Department of Justice do NOT collect their fines in such way. You must remove Department of Justice Virus immediately!

This scam is designed to use the same ways intrussion as all previous Ukash viruses: it uses spam emails, freeware, shareware and other sources to come inside undetected. Once there, it locks the system down and shows its only message, claiming that Windows system has been blocked because you have been using copyrighted content, visiting pornographic websites or even spreading malware. For that, now you have to make a payment of $200 using the Moneypak prepayment system. Here’s how this message looks like:

Your computer has been locked!

This operating system is locked due to the violation of the federal laws of the United States of America (Article: 1, Section 8, Clause 8; Article 202; Article 2012 of the criminal code of the U.S.A. Provides for the deprivation of liberty for four to twelve years.)

Following violations detected:

Your IP address was used to visit websites containing pornopraphy, child pornography, zoophillia and child abuse. Your computer also contains video files with pornographic content, elements of violence and child pornography!

(… )

You have 72 hours to pay the fine, otherwise you will be arrested.

(… )

No matter how trustworthy it seems, you must ignore this alert because it has nothing to do with Department of Justice. If you pay this $100 or $300 fine, you won’t have your computer unlocked and you will lose your money as well. In order to avid that, you should remove Department of Justice Virus as soon as possible.

HOW TO REMOVE THIS VIRUS

In order to remove Department of Justice virus, you should try following this information. It includes different methids that MAY work in this virus removal. Remember that manual removal methid can be used only if you have enough nowledge about computer’s system and its architecture:

* Users infected with Department of Justice virus are allowed to access other accounts on their Windows systems. If one of such accounts has administrator rights, you should be capable to launch anti-malware program.

* Try to deny the Flash to make your ransomware stop function as intended. In order to disable the Flash, go to Macromedia support and select ‘Deny’:

* Flash drive method:

  1. Take another machine and use it to download Spy Hunter or other reputable anti-malware program.
  2. Update the program and put into the USB drive or simple CD.
  3. In the meanwhile, reboot your infected machine to Safe Mode with command prompt and stick USB drive in it.
  4. Reboot computer infected with Department of Justice virus once more and run a full system scan with updated anti-malware program.

* Manual Department of Justice removal (special skills needed!):

  1. Open Windows Start Menu, enter %appdata% into the search field, click Enter.
  2. Go to: Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup.
  3. Remove ctfmon (don’t mix it with ctfmon.exe!).
  4. Open Windows Start Menu, enter %userprofile% into the search field, click Enter.
  5. Go to Appdata\Local\Temp and remove rool0_pk.exeDelete [random characters].mof file
  6. Delete V.class
  7. Run a full system scan with updated spy hunter program to remove remaining Department of Justice virus files.

UPDATE: There is a new Ukash virus, which uses the logo of the Department of Justice. This threat now says ‘ Your Computer Has Been Blocked’ The work of your computer has been suspended on the grounds of the violation of the law of the United States of America”. Similarly to the previous version of the Department of Justice virus, this ransomware shows a list of laws, that have been violated, and asks to pay the fine of $300 using MoneyPak prepayment system. Besides, it speaks to the victim!

Invisible – NOT CYBER – Bullying in the School: Part III – The School Bus and the Classroom

This is the third in a series of three articles related to Invisible Bullying. We refer to it as invisible because it is happening virtually within 25 feet or less from adult supervision and it is going completely unrecognized because the supervisors are often on a completely different “wavelength” from the students they are supervising. Like the adults in the Charlie Brown specials, they are invisible to the students and speak a different language.

We refer to this as Decontextualized Supervision, and although it can prevent seriously bodily harm and make sure people get outside in a natural disaster and maintain general law and order, it does nothing to assist the victims of bullying during the school day. We spoke in Part I of the bullying that occurs in plain sight in the school hallways. Teachers, before you punish a child who is continually late to class automatically, will you please look at that child and ask yourself if this person looks like a person intent on beating the system or one who someone intends to beat on. If you are not sure, err on the side of caution and begin with the assumption that the child is purposely taking the long way to avoid hallway bullies that he or she dreads having to pass each day- because they are really lurking out there- even if you don’t see them.

In the cafeteria, what do you surmise when a kid shows you his new Social Studies Book with a piece of pizza smooshed in the middle? If there are kids that always go to help the librarian instead of going to lunch, does anyone ask the child why?

More children than you would think dread walking in the hallways and going to the cafeteria because of the constant abuse. Yet, for us adults, most of the time we glance into the cafeterias or down the hallway, and everything looks fine to us, except for perhaps a little too much noise. Which group- the kids or the adults have a mistaken impression? Which group of people is out of touch with the realities of the situation? Which group is working with no contextual backdrop? As a supervisor of students, what skills have you developed beyond making comments like, “Keep it down you people, or else!” “If I have to come down there you aren’t going to like it!”and, “I want the both of you to knock it off or you will be seeing me for detention for the next week!” When you said that last one, was it really an even battle, or might someone be the constant perpetrator?

So, we have spoken about the hallways and the cafeteria as being dreaded places for many young people. Next we will talk about the school bus, and this of course, includes getting on and off the school bus at the beginning of each day- another big reason for latenesses to school- an effort to avoid the gauntlet!

The law asserts that the school is responsible for each student who is transported to school from the time they leave their house in the morning till they return. That, of course, is ridiculous because we have enough to worry about in the building and since administrators are not really like the assistant principal in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off- running all over town chasing people like idiots, to expect the school to police someone’s street for the thugs that dwell there is very unrealistic. That being said, once again the bullies are at work at the bus stop in the morning terrorizing the weakest kids. Is anyone surprised that most new Elementary & Secondary schools are being built with pick-up lanes and older buildings have changed the traffic patterns in the parking lot for the cars of parents who drop off and pick up their children each day? 15 years ago, kids either walked to school or rode the bus, with very few parent pick-ups Overprotective? Tell it to the parents of children undergoing this terror every day. Additionally, even the students who are not bothered have learned early on to keep their mouths shut lest they be next on some bully’s “Hit list”.

An additional problem is that, in a school district where the population is sparse, there is only one bus run and all the schools in the district start and end at the same time. This means that your kindergarten child is on the bus every day with high school students, hearing all of the jokes, the verbal and physical abuse, and maybe even providing the bullies with additional easy targets for money, pencils, pens, markers, as well as abuse.

Another problem that nobody grasps is that almost all school districts, in an effort to contract out for everything including teachers, have done away with their busses and hired an independent contractor. The job of bus driver now is taken by someone happy to work part time and with no idea about discipline codes of the school and the disciplinary process. We recall one situation where a bus driver blared a radio the entire ride to and from school with religious music. Another driver curses and swears at the kids who are experts at getting an untrained adult to “take the bait” and lose their temper. In a school bus, people are hit, kicked, spat upon, verbally, assaulted, groped, propositioned, denied seats, their books and belongings are tampered with, they are tripped, the abuse folks, is endless. Occasionally you can see a story of a parent who, fed up with the school’s process, takes matters into her own hands and enters the bus to confront the bullies. Attention you professionals- this is real stuff- we aren’t making it up, and it is torture every day for children that nobody in the school ever hears about, and the driver cannot be expected to see since his or her eyes are on the road. Occasionally, an untrained bus driver will try to set up some kind of specific seating, and often they operate, like the supervisors in the school, with incomplete knowledge of who the culprits really are or they completely ignore the bullies in the hopes that nothing big will happen that day. The truth is, nothing actually noticeable ever happens when a adult watches, yet a girl could still be having lewd remarks about oral sex whispered in her ear, or a kid could be getting touched in some inappropriate way or having someone tamper with their violin, and no adult can see it and no one dares talk about it. The students law of Omerta- is even more iron clad than the Mafia.

I bet you think this is all exaggerated- I mean, really, it can’t be that bad can it? After all, I work in an upper middle class place that fancies itself to be like a private school. Please, we implore you school people, make friends with the students who operate on the dark side. They will enlighten you as to the goings on in their world that you don’t see even if you are looking in the right direction. Well-to-do students can be as cruel and heartless and, in our experience, often even more so than their less fortunate counterparts- and the parents of these children are much quicker to threaten bringing in the “dream team” of lawyers as opposed to working with the school to improve their child’s behavior.

Now we switch to the classroom where one would think that law and order and the prevention of bullying would be the easiest to accomplish because there is a confined area with a teacher watching. Here are some examples of how children can be bullied in plain sight right in the classroom. I take you back to 1965. We are in the band room of a suburban high school where the morning rehearsal is taking place. A very overweight Japanese boy was the tuba player. At least twice a week, the bullies, of which the writer was at least an encouragement to the bullies would have him kicked out of band practice for passing gas out loud during the rehearsal. When the loud gas-passing sound occurred, everyone in the section would get up and walk away yelling, ” Ugh, Benny (his nickname) that’s disgusting”, “I’m not sitting near him”, “he’s a pig”, etc. This would happen during a pause in the playing and the band director’s attention was diverted. The band director, ever the willing dupe, went for the frame up and would angrily toss Benny out of the rehearsal. The problem was, Benny was not passing gas- one of his tormentors was making the gas passing sound, and when it was made, everyone in the section joined in the collective disgust at “Benny” passing gas. In an assembly, when there was a lull in a speech being given by the principal about patriotism, this writer, seated halfway back in the middle of a row, got up to use the lavatory. A “friend” yelled out, “This is boring, I’m Leaving!!! Everyone in the auditorium immediately looked at me and I stood there trying to tell nobody in particular that it wasn’t me who said that. I got detention for a week and worse, of course, since it was still the sixties, even more when I got home.

That is one kind of dilemma. Here’s the next one. A student punches another student in class or pushes his books off the desk for example. The victim, tired of the constant abuse that has been going on every day decides to confront the bully. The teacher turns around from writing on the board, sees the victim standing up in front of the bully in a confrontational pose and immediately sends the victim to the office for his/her aggressive behavior. Do you know your students? After the first few days, any experienced teacher already knows, either by sight, or through the grapevine, which student requires constant scrutiny. When the bully is sitting there looking innocent and a non bully is striking an aggressive pose, do you think that might be a good time- or perhaps after class, to delve into the story with greater intellectual curiosity? The bullies, friends, know the precise moment to strike. As a teacher, do you pay attention to who is going to the lavatory and the time the person always goes? You are right, it’s an impossibility for the most part. Know that abuse is occurring in the lavatory constantly. Creating a process which disturbs the process of the bullies is a good thing, but a teacher must be aware of the context. False equivalency where both parties are told essentially to “sit down and shut up- both of you!” is hurtful to the one who was not doing anything in the first place, but it does bring order, if not justice, to the classroom. Call some Moms and invite them in to sit with their child throughout the class. When the grapevine learns of what you did, most people will stop their devious actions because the shame of one’s Mother sitting in class next to him or her will be a sufficient deterrent.

How about the locker room? How about students paying another student money to snap a picture of someone in the locker room changing clothes and having it go viral? Tampering with one’s clothing and belongings, stealing, physical abuse, verbal abuse is occurring all the time in the locker room and the teacher is generally sitting in his or her office or waiting for the students in the gym. Yes, we realize that the school district refuses to hire anyone past a half day because then they have to give the person benefits, but if there is any place that needs constant watching it is the locker room. Do you have any idea how many students never dress for gym in the high school, choosing instead to take an F and then take Physical Education in summer school where they are required to, for example, walk around the building each day or swim, or go bowling?

Finally, you have all heard the adage, usually said in jest that, “You just can’t find good help anymore!” Well that adage is true in the world of substitute teachers. Most schools cannot find enough trained teachers to serve as substitute teachers. We have seen substitutes actually sleeping in class and others who smell as though they have never showered. Most commonly, however, the substitute teacher seldom, if ever is actually certified in the area of the person he or she is replacing. Now you have a situation like this… A student who strikes another student is seen by the substitute teacher who asks, “What is your name young man?” “Joe Smith!” answers the student.

Bullies love substitute teachers because to begin with, they don’t know anybody’s name. Add to this the fact that the new teachers we see today are different than the old timers who saved up every day so when it came time to retire, the retiring teacher could collect full pay for a year or more. Today’s teacher misses school for the slightest reason without any regard for 30 years from now. The result- infinitely more days with substitute teachers coming in when they can be found.

The week after Thanksgiving is Christmas shopping week, for example- don’t look for a full staff in that week! When substitutes can’t be found the regular staff is asked to watch the class during their duty free period or whole classes are sent to the auditorium where adults who would rather be somewhere else are assigned the task of watching the students during a duty-free period. Check the floor of the auditorium after a couple of mass coverage classes… that will give you some idea about the passion that the supervisor is bringing to the task at hand.

In summary we make these assertions and offer these admonitions.

  1. Most of the bullying that occurs in schools occurs in plain sight and goes unperceived by adults because the adults cannot conceive of such a thing happening in such a place. They approach their responsibility with no grasp of context. They are good at keeping the noise down. No justice can be expected here for the victims. The greatest plans by mental health professional and counselors are doomed to failure without a grasp by the adults of the world in which a student operates.
  2. There is no actual safe place in the school from a bully. The busier the place the better. Bullies need to experience some discomfort and disruption of their process. Be creative. Get Mom in there to walk next to Junior all day for starters. Machiavelli would have referred to this as a “Signal Example”- the effect of which is to deter future bullies- it’s the reason that the law considers punitive or exemplary damages- to send a message to future would-be wrongdoers.
  3. Take a close look at students who frequently miss school, are late for school or class, never dress for gym, or never go to the cafeteria because they want to help a teacher. Do all of these people really look like trouble makers trying to beat the system thus deserving of letter- of- the- law school discipline or do they give off a different message?
  4. Have a meeting in August with all bus drivers to explain to them how the disciplinary process works so there might be a shred of consistency between this disparate group of individuals, most of whom think school discipline would be no problem if the administrators would just “kick a little more butt.” Nobody told them that this kind of punishment is generally against the law- and educators do not make the law- politicians do- educators just try to carry out the law.
  5. Have incentives for teachers who do not miss any school days. At least they know the names of the students. The bullies hate that!
  6. Take the time to develop a working relationship with students who are usually on the wrong side of the discipline code. Many of them are dying to talk to an adult about what is going on but no one has ever taken the time. The police ALWAYS have their informants who operate under cover. Have incentives for these individuals too. The effect will be to disrupt the plans of the Bully. You will know, for example, when someone has brought a weapon to school. In one district, we excelled at this. Kids were always coming in early to tell us things. They became very caring too and would alert you if a certain student looked “strange” that day and could be on drugs, or drunk, for example.

We guarantee that you will be amazed at what you, the adult, did NOT know about what was really going on- even if it was hiding in plain sight. Bullying is never going to go away. Schools are a microcosm of the society we live in. How civil is that society these days? A look at the embarrassing behavior of our elected officials should provide you with some clue as to how fast bullying will disappear. Creativity, perseverance, and awareness are crucial to making any changes in the status quo- get some parents and kids on your side as well.